Morning Docket: 03.15.19

* “This is not a normal vote. This will be a vote about the very nature of our constitution and the separation of powers.” The Senate voted to reject President Trump’s declaration of the national emergency, with 12 Republicans joining with their Democratic colleagues. Now, we’ll wait for the reality TV spectacular that will be the president’s first veto. [Washington Post]

* A poster of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the target of anti-Semitic graffiti in New York. The NYPD’s Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. We’ll have more on this later. [New York Times]

* Key prosecutors on special counsel Robert Mueller’s team are leaving, which could signal that the Russian election interference is coming to an end. The latest prosecutor to head for the exit is Andrew Weissmann, who led cases against Paul Manafort and Rick Gates. [NPR]

Read moreMorning Docket: 03.15.19

Morning Docket: 03.04.19

* Was Michael Cohen involved in any talk about potential pardons? Lawmakers are now very interested in exploring this topic to find out if anyone was allegedly obstructing justice. [Washington Post]

* As we’ve been hearing for a while now, special counsel Robert Mueller will submit his final report soon, and it’s going to turn into a political firestorm. [Bloomberg]

* Meanwhile, Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, says it’s “very clear” that President Trump obstructed justice in Mueller’s probe, and he’s sending out document requests for his own investigation. [Chicago Tribune]

Read moreMorning Docket: 03.04.19