Morning Docket: 01.07.19

* Senator Ted Cruz has proposed a constitutional amendment that would set term limits for those in the Senate (two six-year terms) and House of Representatives (three two-year terms) because “[t]erm limits on members of Congress offer a solution to the brokenness we see in Washington, D.C.” [Business Insider]

* Speaking of terms, the grand jury’s 18-month term in special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation was set to expire this past weekend, but Chief Judge Beryl Howell of the D.C. District Court extended it for up to six months since the jurors’ work is “in the public interest.” [CNN]

* The federal judiciary has enough money to stay afloat until January 11, and then, per a spokesman for the U.S. courts, “[i]t’s really a judge-by-judge, court-by-court determination” when the courts start operating under the Antideficiency Act “to support the exercise of Article III judicial power.” [Fortune]

Read moreMorning Docket: 01.07.19

Morning Docket: 12.31.18

* Michael Cohen: The Movie? Cooley Law’s most infamous graduate could soon be on the big screen, because Trump’s former lawyer/fixer and soon-to-be federal inmate was seen meeting “Pulp Fiction” and “Inglourious Basterds” producer Lawrence Bender. [Page Six]

* Judge Reed O’Connor has stayed his ill-conceived ruling that the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional since many people have already purchased their health insurance plans. Gee thanks, Your Honor. How considerate! [National Law Journal]

* SCOTUS has kept a pretty low profile in the wake of Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation, but that may soon change thanks to the high-profile appeals the justices will be considering. Get ready for some dramatic 5-4 decisions. [Associated Press]

* Speaking of SCOTUS drama, perhaps you’ve been wondering why Chief Justice Roberts intervened in the Mueller investigation. Mueller’s team submitted its briefs on the matter on Friday night, so we’ll soon find out what’s going on. [POLITICO]

Read moreMorning Docket: 12.31.18

Non Sequiturs: 11.11.18

* The unstoppable Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg maintains her three-Term streak as author of the Supreme Court’s first signed majority opinion — and, interestingly enough, it’s a unanimous affirmance of the Ninth Circuit (opinion by my former boss, Judge Diarmuid O’Scannlain). [Empirical SCOTUS]

* When he’s not busy issuing landmark decisions (and feeding his clerks to SCOTUS), Judge Jed Rakoff (S.D.N.Y.) writes erudite essays for the New York Review of Books — like his latest, a review of Joel Richard Paul’s new biography of Chief Justice John Marshall (affiliate link). [New York Review of Books]

* President Donald Trump is transforming the federal judiciary with his youthful and conservative appointments — but the extent of the transformation should not be exaggerated, for reasons identified by Ed Whelan. [Bench Memos / National Review]

* Ann Althouse analyzes some of the juiciest passages in Michelle Obama’s new memoir (affiliate link). [Althouse]

Read moreNon Sequiturs: 11.11.18