Non Sequiturs: 11.11.18

* The unstoppable Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg maintains her three-Term streak as author of the Supreme Court’s first signed majority opinion — and, interestingly enough, it’s a unanimous affirmance of the Ninth Circuit (opinion by my former boss, Judge Diarmuid O’Scannlain). [Empirical SCOTUS]

* When he’s not busy issuing landmark decisions (and feeding his clerks to SCOTUS), Judge Jed Rakoff (S.D.N.Y.) writes erudite essays for the New York Review of Books — like his latest, a review of Joel Richard Paul’s new biography of Chief Justice John Marshall (affiliate link). [New York Review of Books]

* President Donald Trump is transforming the federal judiciary with his youthful and conservative appointments — but the extent of the transformation should not be exaggerated, for reasons identified by Ed Whelan. [Bench Memos / National Review]

* Ann Althouse analyzes some of the juiciest passages in Michelle Obama’s new memoir (affiliate link). [Althouse]

Read moreNon Sequiturs: 11.11.18

Morning Docket: 10.31.18

* Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) says he plans to introduce legislation to end our “absurd policy of birthright citizenship.” Good luck with that, Senator, because if you want to amend the Constitution, you’ll need a two-thirds majority in Congress and ratification of three-quarters of the states. [The Hill]

* Women are allegedly being paid to make false sexual assault and harassment claims against Special Counsel Robert Mueller, and now the FBI is investigating the situation. The going rate for these made-up stories is apparently $20,000. [The Atlantic]

* After having its plan to gift a troubled law school to Middle Tennessee State University be flat-out rejected, Valparaiso Law has decided to call it quits. We’ll have more on this totally unpredictable development later today. [ABA Journal]

Read moreMorning Docket: 10.31.18